Why I Left LiveFyre For the Disqus Commenting System

I Stopped Using LiveFyre, Tonight

And the reason wasn’t really that deep for me.  The short and skinny of it is that I have used Disqus a number of times on other peoples’ blogs, and I always enjoy the experience.  I can vote comments up or down, and people are not required to login to comment – unless they just really feel compelled to do so.

I have also noticed that my spam is on the uptick, and I was growing weary of having to moderate it so much.

The spam never made it through LiveFyre’s filter and ended up being public on my blog, but I could still see it on the back side of the blog.  Deleting was becoming a pain.  In the end, my switch came down to aesthetics.  Let me explain…

I’m pretty old-school when it comes to blog appearance.  

Keeping it simple works well for me…
Why I Left LiveFyre For the Disqus Commenting System - 1

Choosing Disqus Came Down To A Very Simple Concern For Me – Aesthetics!

Throughout this blog, you can now see a picture of my daughter in the background.

When I first set up this blog again, I had a black and white picture of myself.  It – like my current picture – was darker at the bottom than at the top of the image.  It was an image that made the site more interesting…but there was one problem:  My commenting system was translucent, and I could not read the comments that people had written.

Back then, I did not know how to edit my CSS.  Now, I do…but seriously? I did not want to do that.  After all, I chose a commenting system to make things more efficient, not to give myself more, needless work.

I Want My Commenting System To Have Options That Matter To Me

If I went through the trouble of choosing a commenting system that isn’t the native WordPress one, I want it to have some editing capabilities that are easy to find and easy to implement.

In the administration panel of LiveFyre, there is no way to edit the appearance of my comments.  In a word, that was #Irritating. (I know that hashtags don’t work on blogs.  I just like hashtags.)  🙂

In the administration panel of Disqus, there is a nifty, little button to allow the comments to be customized for darker-colored sites versus lighter-colored sites.  That was just too cool to see!  One click, and I had comments that would be easy to see, even with my darker-themed background image.

With LiveFyre, I was forced to choose a boring color as my background in order to be able to see my comments.  Now, the blog can have personality, again, and it’s starting to feel like home.  I love that feeling.  It’s been a long, long time since I felt at home on this site.  Customizing the appearance to make it look exactly like I want it to helps me with that process.

With Disqus, I can start to really fall in love with my blog.

It Takes Up To 24 Hours For Comments To Export To Disqus…But No Worries

Why I Left LiveFyre For the Disqus Commenting System - 2My comments were already in my WordPress database, so there should be no issues with comments showing up at some point.  Though I really would hate to lose all of my comments, I’m in a place where I’d actually be cool if I did. I’d cry – a little – but I would get over it.

Ultimately, Disqus just seems to be a better system to engage conversation and to also FIND interesting conversations all over the internet.  I intend to take advantage of the community at some point, but I am in no rush.

I’ll be sure to come back and update in this article if I have issues porting my comments.  If I do, it will most likely be my fault, and I’ll let you know what I did wrong.  🙂

Last Thing: Pat Flynn Uses Disqus!

I know it’s silly to do things that other bloggers do for no, other reason than the fact that you admire the blogger’s content, but after I made the decision to switch, tonight, I headed over to Pat Flynn’s blog to see what commenting system he uses.

It’s been a little while since I read his blog, but I always enjoy what I read when I go there.  Imagine my joy in finding that, not only does he use Disqus, but he even wrote an article on it, recently.  You can check out his article, here.

All in all, I am excited to see what the Disqus commenting system has to offer, and I hope that, once I start engaging with my bloggy friends again, sometime soon, they will find this system easier to use than LiveFyre was.

Thanks for reading!

Update: April 27th, 2014 @ 8:31pm

I had to download a WXR file to my computer and then upload it to Disqus, and all my comments finally showed.  It was a very very easy process!

Christi Johnson

Christi Johnson is a blogger and a social media marketer.She is also a homeschooling mother and a digital advertising consultant.

She shows people how to use their blog for income and live a life that they have always wanted to live as creative people. If you want to be a content creator AND a great marketer, keep reading, here!
  • http://glennedixon.com/ Glenn Dixon

    Christi – I know you wrote this awhile back, but I just wanted to say thanks for your great input. I have waffled on this issue so many times it isn’t even funny. But the last straw was spam. It may not be Livefyre’s fault, but they require that I have WordPress comments turned on. And so, even though there are no WordPress comments actually showing on any post, the spammers can still get to it. I have to process about 10 spam comments a week, usually on really *old* posts. So I’m going back to Disqus. Thanks again!

    • http://www.mhmcintyre.us/ Mark McIntyre

      I’ve had very few issues using Livefyre with Akismet. Akismet eliminates the spam. On a few of the blogs I follow, I’ve noticed that old post get spam even with Disqus. So, there is no perfect solution.

      • http://glennedixon.com/ Glenn Dixon

        Mark – Akismet just holds the spam, but I still have to do something with it. I prefer systems that *prevent* the spam in the first place. I’ve had very little with Disqus.